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Psychology News Roundup: ICYMI December 13, 2019

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See what you may have missed in the world of personality and social psychology on this week's ICYMI roundup.

Recently in the news, written a post, or have selections you'd like us to consider? Email us, use the hashtag #SPSPblog, or tweet us directly @spspnews. 

The Global Self-Judgment Paradox in Student Performance

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Students who perform the best don’t necessarily have the highest levels of self-confidence.

The Illusion of Consensus

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The fake news trap: The more something’s repeated, the more we believe it—regardless of whether it is true.

How Much of This Post Will You Read Before Making Up Your Mind About It?

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Most people will fail to anticipate how quickly they will decide how much they like this blog. And this probably applies to many other judgments.

Why We Love People, Places, and Things That Resemble Us

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If your name is Allen and you moved to Allentown, sold Allen wrenches, and married Ellen, it’d be hard to blame you.

Avoiding information to protect an intuitive preference

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Starting a diet? Avoiding the bakery section at the grocery store is a good way to start. Not knowing what tempting baked goods are available can make it easier to stick with your health goal.

But what if you’re out celebrating a big promotion, and the chocolate cake is already calling your name? Could avoiding information about the calorie count of the cake before you make your decision also be considered a “smart” strategy?

Gender Roles Highlight Gender Bias in Judicial Decisions

Judges may be just as biased or even more biased than the general public in deciding court cases where traditional gender roles are challenged, according to a new study published in the journal Social Psychological and Personality Science.

This study examined the role of gender bias relating to judges and legal decisions, and the sex discrimination worked both ways, sometimes against women and sometimes against men.

How Neighborhoods, Clothing, and Suspect Race Impact Decisions to Shoot

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Despite the long history of police violence against racial minorities in the United States, recent high-profile shooting incidents of unarmed racial minorities have gained national attention, such as the shooting deaths of African Americans Trayvon Martin and Michael Brown. The resulting social movements, led by Black Lives Matter, have refocused media attention on the roles that race and racial stereotypes play in police behavior. What causes both officers and community members to shoot unarmed racial minorities? What role do racial stereotypes play in this process?

When do humanlike virtual assistants help - or hinder - online learning?

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Online learning is an increasingly popular tool across most levels of education. Currently, all 50 states in the United States offer online learning at the K-12 level, and about 74% of K-8 teachers use educational software as a classroom tool. About 5.8 million higher education students are taking at least one online course, and revenue from mobile learning products in North America is predicted to rise steadily, reaching $410 million by the end of 2018.

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